Bassett Lecture 2015: Professor Marcus Doel

Bassett lecture

My lovely colleague Nina has been busy organising this year’s Bassett Lecture. It looks set to be a great talk and, as usual, all are welcome to come along. Details as follows: 

The 5th annual Bassett lecture will take place in the School of Geographical Sciences on Thursday 29th January 2015.

This year’s speaker is Professor Marcus Doel from Swansea University, who will be presenting under the title, ‘Through a net darkly: spatial expression and schizoanalysis (subject to finance).’

The lecture will take place at 4pm on Thursday 29th January in the Peel Lecture Theatre.

All Welcome!

No booking required, for enquiries contact Nina Williams (Nina.Williams@bristol.ac.uk).

Abstract:
In Anti-Oedipus, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari wrote that Louis Hjelmslev’s “concerted destruction of the signifier” not only unleashed “a decoded theory of language” that was perfectly attuned to both capitalist and schizophrenic flows, but also that it was “the only modern—and not archaic—theory of language.” Hjemslev was the blast of fresh air that blew Ferdinand de Saussure and Jacques Lacan away, and ushered in a post-structuralist schizoanalysis of world-historical libidinal flows. The encounter with Hjelmslev proved pivotal for Guattari, the force of which reverberated throughout all of his subsequent writings. Hjelmslev effectively counter-signed the two volumes of Capitalism & Schizophrenia and Kafka that Guattari wrote with Deleuze, as well as Guattari’s own Machinic Unconscious, Schizoanalytic Cartographies, The Three Ecologies, and Chaosmosis. And yet, “the Danish Spinozist geologist, Hjelmslev, that dark prince descended from Hamlet,” was never the subject of sustained attention in any of these texts. In this lecture I consider the import of Hjelmslev for Guattari, with particular reference to the spatiality of the structural unconscious and the machinic unconscious, and use this as a basis to think through the bewildering cast of characters that are ‘subject to finance’ and that increasingly plague our world, such as Homo Economicus, Homo Debitor, Homo Faber, Homo Subprimicus, and Financial Homo Sacer.

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Prof. Tim Ingold – Bassett Lecture, Bristol 30/1/14 4pm

A little more blatant advertising for an event I’ve been involved with organising….

The School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol is proud to host the 2014 Bassett lecture. This year’s presenter is Professor Tim Ingold from the University of Aberdeen.

Prof. Ingold will present under the title ‘Making and Growing, Doing and Undergoing’

Thursday 30th January, 4pm, Peel Lecture Theatre, School of Geographical Sciences (BS8 1SS)

All welcome!

Abstract:
To make, we commonly think, is to implement a design that has already come within reach of the imagination; to do is to carry out the operations that such implementation requires. If making puts the emphasis on the final product, doing emphasises the performances that lead to it. Growing, on the other hand, is what happens to things – it is what they undergo. Where making and doing are active and intentional, growing and undergoing are passive and biophysical. In this lecture I question these distinctions, and aim to establish a sense of making-as-growing, and of doing-as-undergoing: a kind of action without agency that is characteristic of lives that are not just lived but led. Such lives are human.

Biography:
Tim Ingold is a Professor of Anthropology in the School of Social Science at the University of Aberdeen. His interests include environmental perception, language, technology and skilled practice, art and architecture, creativity, theories of evolution in anthropology, human-animal relations, and ecological approaches in anthropology. Recent books include ‘Making: Anthropology, Archaeology, Art and Architecture’ (Routledge, 2013), ‘Biosocial Becomings: Integrating Social and Biological Anthropology’ (co-edited, CUP, 2013), and ‘Being Alive: Essays on Movement, Knowledge and Description’ (Routledge, 2013).

The Bassett Lecture:
The Bassett Lecture is held every year in honour of Dr. Keith Bassett, a critical geographer and long-time Senior Lecturer in the School of Geographical Sciences. Although formally retired, Dr. Bassett continues to write, teach, and contribute to the intellectual life of the School and University. The lecture series recognizes Dr. Bassett’s work and contributions in the fields of social and geographical theory, critical geographies of political economy, urbanism, social movements and social justice, political ecology, and critical socio-legal studies. Prof. Ingold’s lecture will be the fourth in the series. The 2012 Bassett Lecture was presented by Prof. Erik Swyngedouw (Manchester), whilst in 2011 the School welcomed Prof. Melissa Wright (Penn State).